Bandon Library Friends and Foundation, Inc.

The Bandon Library provides a venue for local artists to display their works.  The lobby entryway to the Library and Sprague Room is used to house juried exhibits which change monthly.  Contact the Bandon Library Board, a committee of the city of Bandon, if you are interested in showing your work.

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Visit the library!  Don't miss this month's show.

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November 2011

Pearl Maxner's paintings will be shown in the gallery space and the exhibit is titled "Memories of Hawaii."

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In the display cases, Pearl's exhibit is called, "How to Illustrate a Children's Book."


ABOUT PEARL MAXNER

Pearl grew up on the banks of the Kaweah River in the Sierra Nevada foothills with wilderness all around her. She spent hundreds of carefree, barefoot days traipsing the hills in close association with the natural world. Currently living on a small organic farm along Salmon Creek in the Siskiyou Mountains in Oregon gives her the same immediate opportunity to live with and study the things she loves most about God’s incredible creation.

Pearl’s mother is Donna Fairman, a nationally known Porcelain Artist. Though not formally trained by her mother, she has been drawing and painting since she was a child. “I spent my entire life watching my Mother paint. It was a very strong message to me that painting and art in general was a desirable thing to do.”

She has lived in Oregon for three years. She migrated here after a 16 year stay in Hawaii and loves her new surroundings. She lives with her husband, Jay, on their little organic farm with goats, chickens, and dogs.

Pearl has been involved in several publishing venues: Aims Educational Foundation as an illustrator, Calaveras Big Trees State Park Association newsletter art editor, “My Hawaiian Farm” written and illustrated by Pearl, (Island Heritage), illustrator for “The Hawaiian Bat” by Marion Coste, (University of Hawaii Press) “Luna’s Prayer”, by Luna Edwards, (AuthorHouse Publishing) and “The Bitterness Tree,” (Anchor Books Publishing), by Mike Marsoun.

She teaches art in the public schools, and has taught many workshops and individuals as well over the past 20 years.  She did three public murals while living in Hawaii. In 2010 with the local school children, she did a mural for the library in Powers, Oregon. The  theme was the natural environment of the Siskiyou Mountains. Her current mural is an old fashioned “crate label” made for the Powers Community Garden. She is also working on a grant project with Coos County Cultural Coalition. She has finished her first coloring book called The Mammals Of the Rogue-Siskiyou National Forest. The second, Reptiles and Amphibians of the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest, in a series of 8 will be completed this fall. You can view her work at www.farmgirlart.com. 

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October 2011

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The title of the Library Art show is: "NATURE'S BOUNTY: FLOWERS AND SCENERY"
Watercolor Paintings by Jean Boynton and Vanessa Jorgensen

Although Vanessa and Jean have very different styles, they both enjoy exploring the fluidity and vibrancy of watercolors with the desire to capture the essence, aliveness and beauty that flowers and nature inspire.

Below is one of Jean's watercolor paintings entitled "Oriental Poppies".

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The title of the case display show is:  "Tins of Another Time"

Dawn Vonderlin, the artist, explains her collection below.


I remember the old colorful board games my Grandparents had when we were kids, and the old toys and stories of their childhood, so I developed an interest in vintage illustrated children books and prints, Victorian art and antiques.


I starting collecting tins when I was a sophomore in high school. I won't bother to tell you exactly how long ago that was...suffice it to say...many, many moons have passed since then. The wonderful graphics on some of the old tins intrigued me.

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One day while poking around in an antique shop, I spotted an RCA Victor tin from 1904 in the case. I just loved the graphic of the Dog and the Gramophone, and the turquoise color made it even more attractive. "His Masters Voice" was ringing in my brain. I kept thinking of that tin, and anytime I was near that shop, I went in to see if it was still there. The $27.50 price tag was a bit steep for babysitter wages, so I just kept it on my wish list. The storekeeper knew I really wanted that tin, so she said she would accept $25.00. Still out of reach for my budget. I kept hoping to get that old tin. Once again I went in the shop, this time with all my savings in hand to see if it was still there. It was...so I offered my $22.00 and some change for the tin. She smiled and took my hard earned cash. It finally became mine.

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That was the start of my search for colorful, amusing or interesting history made of tin. I have collected ever since. I am very partial to tins with children or ladies or gentleman. Of course the Victor tins still remain among my favorites since "Nipper" sparked the interest in collecting "Tins of Another Time".
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